Friday, November 03, 2006

Quilting Meme: The Orphan Block

Part of this journey of quilting has been learning how to do many, many new things. Learning to work with others, learning to give away things that I love and want to keep for myself, learning to appreciate other's creativity even when it is different from my own and learning to be part of a bigger community both in real life and online that I never even knew existed before!

I discovered memes and I didn't even know what that word meant! According to Wikipedia, it refers "to a unit of cultural information transferable from one mind to another." One which somehow binds us as one in its transmission and sharing.

Part of this journey has been my willingness to be 'tagged' and to post my own Quilting Meme.

Have You Ever? Variation: The Orphan Block Meme
1. Taken or given a quilting class
2. Paper pieced
3. Hand quilted
4. Hand pieced
5. Created your own pattern
6. Published a pattern in a magazine or book
7. Gone on a quilting retreat
8. Gone to a quilting convention
9. Met someone who wrote a quilting book
10 Combined your quilting with some other craft
11. Done any three dimensional quilting
12. Made something using designer fabric
13. Made something using batiks
14. Dyed your own fabric
15. Made a landscape hanging
16 Made a quilted bag or piece of quilted clothing
17 Made a baby quilt
18 Made a wall hanging
19 Made a journal quilt
20 Submitted your journal quilt for viewing
21 Made a fabric postcard
22 Made an artistic trading card
23 Exchanged artistic trading cards
24. Mailed your own postcard
25. Made a lap quilt
26 Made a twin size quilt
27 Made a full size quilt
28 Made a queen size quilt
29 Made a king size quilt
30 Donated a quilt to charity
31 Sent a quilt out to a quilter
32 Thrown away a UFO
33 Given away a UFO
34 Cut up a UFO and made something else with it
35 Ripped fabric instead of cutting it
36 Made a quilt exactly like the pattern, with no changes whatsoever
37 Made an applique quilt
38 Quilted your own quilt
39 Did free motion quilting
40 Put any embroidery or beads on your quilt
41 Given away your quilt to a stranger
42 Swapped fabric
43 Swapped blocks
44 Participated in a round robin
46 Kept a journal about your quilting
47 Written a letter to someone who made an antique quilt
48 Made a patriotic quilt for a wounded soldier
49 Kept a blog about your quilting
50 Participated in a gift exchange
51 Sent a quilting random act of kindness
52 Joined a newsgroup about quilting
53 Made a quilt using a pattern from any website
54 Joined an online block of the month
55 Made a block of the month quilt
56 Subscribed to a fabric of the month club
57 Bought fabric at an online store
58 Bought fabric from ebay
59 Own more than one sewing machine
60 Have a room dedicated solely to sewing
61 Hide a fabric purchase
62 Finished making a holiday gift before July
63 Spent more than $200 in one quilt shopping trip
64 Made a quilt using a book from the library
65 Worked with someone else to make a quilt
66. Joined a quilt guild or club
67 Become president or other officer of a quilt group
68 Taught a quilting class
69 Helped someone else get the quilting bug
70 Taught a child to sew
71 Made a quilt with a serger
72 Made a miniature or doll sized quilt
73 Subscribe to a quilting magazine from your own country
74 Subscribe to a quilting magazine from another country
75 Bought fabric from another country
76 Swapped completed quilts with someone else
77 Asked for quilting help online
78 Gone to a quilt shop to ask for quilting help
79 Bought fabric at a local quilt shop
80 Traveled more than 100 miles to go to a quilt shop
81 Used nontraditional fabric for a quilt
82 Made a quilt using instructions given to you on a blog
83 Make comments on someone's quilting blog
84 Met a quilter in person after only having talked online
85 Had a quilting retreat in your home
86 Own quilting software
87 Made a quilt you designed on your quilting software
88 Done any quilt research - history, interviewing quilters, etc.
89 Had any quilt related subject published anywhere
90 Donated a quilt to a museum
91 Bought a quilt from a thrift store
92 Made a quilt using fabric from a thrift store
93 Made a quilt using photos
94 Made a pastel quilt
95 Made a quilt using brights
96 Made a quilt using ethnic fabric from another country
97 Made a quilt using leftover blocks from other quilts
98 Had your quilt in a magazine, newspaper, newsletter, TV, etc.
99. Submitted your quilt to a quilt show
100. Won any ribbons with your quilts
101 Had more finished quilts than UFOs
102 Made a quilt using reproduction fabrics
103 Took a break from quilting that was longer than a year
104 Made money with your quilting
105 Had a job in the fabric or quilting industry

One of the numbers is missing. I guess that this is my "Orphan Block Meme".

P.S. A big thanks to Shelina! I just discovered that she is the originator of the orginal quilting meme. Memes mutate by definition. That is how they got their name..from 'mimicry' !

2 comments:

  1. Someone told me meme meant all about me. Me. Me.
    I noticed the patriotic quilt, and the making a quilt with a serger. Didn't see orphan blocks, and didn't know I was missing a number. Those are different from the original meme.

    I originaally had a duplicate, and so I changed it and did some more minor edits, like taking out question marks. Since the original had been copied, there were two different ones done by me. I fully expected this meme to take a life of its own, and was curious to see how long it would take before my name would be taken off.

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  2. Shelina, I have actually noticed a number of bloggers who have spelled it MeMe. It appears to truly be 'meme'.I found the definition on Wikipedia and found that it is similar to an urban legend in the sense that it is something which spread and spreads and mutates in the process. I actually created some of the mutations myself, but had I known you started this phenomena, I would most certainly have given you the credit you deserved! It has been an amazing thing to follow online!!! Orphan Block was my play on words because of the missing number:)Thanks for commenting. I feel honored!!

    ReplyDelete

Michele Bilyeu blogs "With Heart and Hands" as she journeys between Douglas, Alaska and Salem, Oregon.