Thursday, October 31, 2013

Halloween Superstitutions of Olde

  

Beware of the following superstitions of olde!

• Many people used to consider that owls would dive down to eat the souls of the dying on Halloween. They believed that if you pulled your own pockets out, and left them hanging, the dying would be safe. (Good to know, especially the next time you get caught with your pockets hanging out from the dryer!)

• To ward off evil spirits on Halloween, bury all the animal bones in your front yard, or even put a picture of an animal very close to your doorway. (I'll assume they mean collected wishbones and leftovers from Thanksgiving for the burials, and not those of anyone else, for the photos.)

• People used to believe you could walk around your house three times backwards before sunset on Halloween, and that would take care of all evil. (Next time you can't find the kids for dinner, remember you're keeping your family safe at the same time.)

• It has been said if a bat flies into your house on Halloween, it is a sign that ghosts or spirits are very nearer, and maybe they are in your home and let the bat in. (Living in the country, I've had bats in my house on several occasions. My friends claim they live in my own 'belfry', as well.)

• People used to believe that if bats are out early on Halloween, and they fly around playfully, then good weather is to come. (The bats in my belfry are beyond playful. I've been known to be borderline manic.)

• If a bat flies around your house three times on Halloween, death is very soon to come. (Doesn't this negate the good luck of the above?)

• It could be the spirit of a dead loved one watching you, if you watch a spider on Halloween. (And if you're watching, do so respectfully, and don't squish them!)

• Going in for what was once called a 'dumb' supper, meaning that nobody will talk while having supper, encourages the spirits to come to the table. (Well, not only is that term antiquated and not p.c., most families today with teenagers suffer from this predicament, so it's no wonder that most teenagers appear possessed.)

• It is believed that if an unmarried girl keeps a rosemary herb and a silver sixpence under her pillow on Halloween night, it is quite likely that on that very night, she would dream of her future husband. (If you have young daughter's, check their pillows tonight and remove those sixpence.)

• It is said that if you hear someone's footsteps behind you on the Halloween night, you should not turn back because it may be a dead following you. And if you commit the mistake of looking back, it is likely that you might join the dead very soon. (You just can't win on this one. I'm staying home and wearing ear plugs.)

• People believe that if on the Halloween night, a girl carrying a lamp in her hand goes to a spring of water, she will see the reflection of her life partner in water. (This sounds dangerous to me, especially if you believe in the superstition just above, and the one following you is already dead. Sure wouldn't want him for my life partner.)

• People have a superstition that if an unmarried girl carries a broken egg in a glass and takes it to a spring of water, she will be able to catch the glimpse of not just her future husband, by mixing some spring water in the glass, but also she can see the reflection of her future kids.
(OK, this is just too much. Now we are being followed by the dead, stuck with them for life and sharing common ghouls.)

• There is the old saying that "black cats are bad luck". It was once believed that black cats were the devil, or consumed by evil spirits. (I 've had several black cats, I loved them dearly, they slept with me every night. Time for an exorcism. Now, do I exorcise all black cats or just me?)

• People used to believe that Satan was a nut-gatherer. Nuts were also used as magic charms on the day of Halloween festival. (At this point, I'm feeling nutty. I think the exorcism has to be on me.)

• If you put your clothes on inside out as well as outside walk backwards on Halloween night. At midnight you will see a witch in the sky. People used to believe witches were the devil, or that they were consumed by evil. (I've been known to do both, on a fairly consistent basis. No wonder I run into so many witchy people and was gifted with a sign that says "If the broom fits, ride it"! It fit and I do.

• There is also an old saying "if the flame on your candle goes out on Halloween celebration; it gives you the meaning that you are with a ghost". (Stocking up on matches, lighters, and battery powered lanterns)

• If you ring a bell on Halloween it will frighten evil spirits away. (Ding!)

shown above:
One of my favorite photos of myself. And yes, I do sit around doing magic and creating magical potions for Halloween.  No need to be afraid! I'm from the light side, not the dark. I just have to work in the dark a lot, to help others ;-) Join my wilde ride and become a follower of this blog ;-)


Recipes and Photo Tutorial!
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Happy Halloween from Salem, Oregon and Douglas (Island) Alaska 

and to all points, and four corners of this world...and ...oh yeah.....to all of those beyond!


Michele Bilyeu blogs With Heart and Hands as she shares a quilting journey through her life in Salem, Oregon and Douglas, Alaska. Sewing, quilting, and wildcrafting, with small format art quilts, prayer flags, and comfort quilts for a variety of charitable programs. And best of all, sharing thousands of links to Free Quilt and Quilt Block Patterns and encouraging others to join her and make and donate quilts to charitable causes.   Help us change the world, one little quilt at a time!

7 comments:

  1. They have you coming and going with all the superstitions. However, it all sounds fun to me.

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  2. Hi Michele. These are kinda funny. Thanks for listing them. It is amazing what folklore has been passed down from generation to generation. My MIL would always tie a knot in a curtain every time she heard a whipowill.(?) She said that their call meant death. And a knot in a curtain would prevent it. Go figure. Happy Halloween.

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  3. Most of these are new superstitions to me, but I WILL keep them in mind. :)

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  4. Makes me wonder how all these superstitions got started

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  5. What a great post - I love those superstitions :). Lovely photo of you :)

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  6. Hi Michele. My Dad was born on Halloween and would have been 102 yesterday, had he lived. I almost did not read this post. Being of Irish heritage, I swear I have heard every Halloween superstition, especially tales of the Banshee, from an early age. I would have missed so much had I not read this post because the true joy comes from your asides. I have tears pouring down my face from laughter. You are a hoot! I often wish I had a good sense of humor but I think I was behind the door when those were given out. Always too serious. You truly made my day. Thanks! Oh, I live in a senior community and we have a monthly newsletter. With proper credit to you and your blog, would our social worker be able to print this next year?

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  7. My congratulations for your site! It helped me a lot and enjoyed , especially that all your shares are interesting. Long life to your site. Above all, never give up , your blog is really great!


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Michele Bilyeu blogs "With Heart and Hands" as she journeys between Douglas, Alaska and Salem, Oregon.