Wednesday, November 08, 2006

The Lofting of the Batt


batt,batting, filling,wadding (in the UK)
non-woven fabric manufactured by putting small fibers together in the form of a sheet or web, and then binding them either mechanically with serrated needles, with an adhesive, or thermally melting the binder onto a web.

The filling, or batting, is what determines the loft of the quilt. A lofted place means one which is lifted up. So lofting our fabric is lifting it up higher and higher. Maybe that is why I sometimes love to use really high non-traditional batt and make my quilts so puffy they have to be tied and not machine quilted. I love 'lifting them up' and seeing the detail that is created in the fabric itself. I have always loved creating wall hangings for that very reason.

This season, I had the added fun of scrounging through the fallen autumn leaves for the 'perfect' cottonwood twig to use with my little welcoming pumpkin. It didn't last very long outside in our entry. Everyone, but myself...was too tall and their heads brushed it askew or attempted to knock it down.

So now it resides happily inside, ensconced on a wall where it seeks to welcome others by peering across the hall and through an office window. It makes me laugh everytime I walk past it...not because I am proud of its creation (I am, after all, a very simple quilter:) but because I remember being outside in the wind and the rain..searching for the perfect twig hanger.

I remember the looks on my first visitors' faces when they had to avoid hitting their heads as they passed under it. I twinkled at the synchronicity of discovering a little meandered duck face in one corner...after watching so many people 'duck down' under it. It is the journey of the quilting that gives me joy, not just the quilted creation, itself!

6 comments:

  1. I followed your link from your comment on Shelina's blog. What a wonderful post. I will keep reading your blog. /paula the_quilter at yahoo dot com

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  2. Thank you so much, Paula! I have your blog on my list,now, as well! Loved your comment on poly/cotton 'burn tests'! I started out in beta and it's been an adventure to say the least, especially with dial up! I have had to really speed up my learning curve on this blog business!

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  3. You express the emotions of why we make quilts so well. You've prompted my next posting about one of the quilts I made as a wedding present. Thank you for your postings as well as the idea.

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  4. Thank you, Nellie! I must tell you that your blog is one of my absolute favorites and one I visit everyday! I respect your comment, so much!

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  5. Hello there, *VBS*, just had to pop over and see where you blog about our passions for fabric and thread..*VBS*
    Thank you so much for your nice comment. I really, really hope you will consider taking the basting frame. Mine was made by my dad, the last year of two of his life. He had come to live with us after the diagonsis and surgery for advanced bone cancer.
    I truly treasure the frame that he made specially for me. That's why it's fairly high as frames go. I'd bent over a too low frame so many years at my friends houses...I wanted one that was a comfortable height for me. He did what I asked, but was sure it would be too high. So he made the holding side boards adjustable....LOL
    Reading some of your posting is much like hearing myself talk. I'm an old hand at orphan blocks that become orphan train quilts. Life as a patchwork quilt, working with what we have has long been my mind and heart set. I hope you'll come back often and get to know all the wonderful gals who blog under both the Maverick logo as well as the Stash quilts..*VBS* I've bookmarked you, and I'll be back. Hugs, Finn

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  6. Oh Finn! No wonder everyone in blog land loves you! Reading about your dad and your basting frame brought tears to my eyes and a yearning for that connection to my heart. Note to me: Clean garage for bringing in one more treasured item! Choice two: Sell couch! I visit your site daily since I learned about blogging and love dearly the gals at both Stash and Maverick blog listings. I love the energies of your carings for one another and all that you share and teach in that sharing. Thank you so much!

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Michele Bilyeu blogs "With Heart and Hands" as she journeys between Douglas, Alaska and Salem, Oregon.